Rational Feed

Scott:

If Kim Jong Un Opened A KFC Would You Eat There? by Scott Alexander – Should we reward bad actors when they start to do good?

Rationalist:

The AI Does Not Hate You By Tom Chivers by Ruby – A book about the rationality community has been released: ‘This is a book about AI and AI risk. But it’s also more importantly about a community of people who are trying to think rationally about intelligence, and the places that these thoughts are taking them, and what insight they can and can’t give us about the future of the human race over the next few years. It explains why these people are worried, why they might be right, and why they might be wrong. It is a book about the cutting edge of our thinking on intelligence and rationality right now by the people who stay up all night worrying about it.’

Podcast:

Googlenomics by Conversations With Tyler – Interview with the Chief Economist at Google: ‘Tyler asks Hal these questions and more: why aren’t there more second-priced auctions — or prediction markets? How have the economics of sales changed with the internet? In what ways did his hiring criteria change between academia and business? What could we learn from the sack of Rome? When should economists avoid looking at the literature? How are we always eking out victory in the war on spam? And what are people least likely to understand about Google? Fear not — Hal has an answer for it all.’

Rational Feed

Scott:

Followup On The Baumol Effect by Scott Alexander – Scott reconsiders the accuracy of three claims: Median wages, including wages in high-productivty sectors like manufacturing, are not rising, Wages for doctors and teachers have not risen, The Baumol effect cannot make things genuinely less affordable, but things are genuinely less affordable

Rationalist:

Reason Isn’t Magic by Ben Hoffman – Reasons doesn’t always outperform tradition but that is not the right standard. Ben discusses the case of manioc and why the takeaways should be unclear.

The Finders by Bayesian Investor – ‘Fundamental Wellbeing’ seems to correlate with a lose of ‘Narrative-Self’. In more advanced cases it involves a loss of ‘self’ in general.

Political:

How To Write Values Dissonance by Ozy – If you write about values dissonance you need to show how the dissonant values could be compelling. Eliezer’s Three Worlds Collide fails to do this.

Podcast:

Cass Sunstein: How Change Happens by 80,000 Hours – ‘Prof Cass Sunstein on how social change happens, and why it’s so often abrupt & unpredictable’

Rationalist

Scott:

Open Thresh by Scott Alexander – Bi-weekly public open thread.

Rationalist:

Podcast: The Switch by Jacob Falkovich – Jacob was interviewed on a podcast. Some topics: How business school led me to rationality. Fake frameworks as the key to rationality and why I prefer Magic the Gathering personality color wheel to the big 5 personality system or MBTI. Rationality alone and in a group. Why soccer is a supreme entertainment product, aesthetic experience, and showcase of virtue. MMA as a gateway drug to loving sports.

Rational Feed

Political:

Impressions Of China by Peter Turchin – Impressions from a trip to China fifteen years since the author’s last trip. Material progress has been amazing and the population trusts the government. However China is a police state even if the machinery of oppression is not too overt.

The Dsm Iv Believed Women Didn’t Have Paraphilias by Ozy – As recently as 2000 mainstream psychology thought kinks besides submission were almost nonexistent in women. the internet has changed this.

Misc:

Debunking Skepticism by Mike Huemer – ‘Debunking skeptics (that is, those skeptics who seek to debunk our beliefs) argue that second-order reflection ought to convince us that our ordinary (e.g.) moral judgment faculties are unreliable. Once we realize this, the skeptics argue, we should set aside the beliefs that issue from those faculties, however plausible they might have seemed. Following the same logic, we can engage in higher-order reflection on the way in which we arrive at skeptical philosophical beliefs, including reflection on whether the reasoning of philosophers is afflicted with a bias. If it independently seems likely that philosophical reasoning is affected by a skeptical bias, then we should not simply evaluate skepticism by directly assessing the skeptics’ arguments; we should set aside those arguments because they are probably unreliable. The effect of this is to return us to the state we were in before we encountered skeptical arguments–that is, for most, a return to common sense morality.’

Rational Feed

Scott:

Highlights From The Comments On Cultural Evolution by Scott Alexander – Highlight Comments. Some are very good counter arguments. For example: ‘in our current system (democratic market economies with large governments) the common practice of taking down Chesterton fences is a process which seems well established and has a decent track record, and should not be unduly interfered with (unless you fully understand it)’

Political:

Decision Markets For Monetary Policy by Robin Hanson – ‘Monetary policy seems an especially good case to apply decision markets because they clearly have two required features: 1) A clear set of discrete decision options, where it is clear afterward which option was taken, 2) A reasonably strong consensus on measurable outcomes that such decisions are trying to increase. That is, monetary policy consists of clear public and discrete choices, such as on short term interest rates. ‘